The Garment District
Bordered by W34th Street and W42nd Street to the north and south, and 5th Avenue and 7th Avenue to the east and west of midtown Manhattan, is the historic Garment District. A global hub of all things fashion, the buildings in these 12 city blocks are full to the rafters with showrooms, fashion houses, textile wholesalers and designers. Outside 555 7th Avenue is “The Garment Worker” (1984) by Judith Weller, an 8-foot bronze sculpture commissioned by the International Ladies Garment Workers Union and the Public Art Fund to commemorate the Jewish garment workers at the turn of the century. And don’t miss the “needle and button” on top of The Fashion Center Kiosk at the corner of w40th Street and 7th Avenue, home to all the answers you’ll need.

Lincoln Center
The best place to watch each New York’s Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week  parade of the well-heeled and the well-connected in the fashion world is at the Lincoln Center. Since the collections made their move four seasons ago from Bryant Park to the Columbus Circle hub of art and culture, the Center is the place to catch glimpses of influencers like Anna Wintour, Carine Roitfeld, Taylor Tomasi-Hill, Tavi Gevinson and Nina Garcia.

Metropolitan Museum of Art
The Met (as it is commonly known) opened to the public at its current site on 5th Avenue at E82nd Street on March 30, 1880. Home to works by masters Renoir and Matisse among others, it is an art lovers haven. But, thanks to the annual Costume Institute Gala (and subsequent show) held at the Met, it’s a destination for all self-respecting style folk. Seasons past have seen exhibitions including “Savage Beauty” featuring the work of Alexander McQueen in 2011 and last year’s “Impossible Conversations” highlighting the careers and work of designers Elsa Schiaparelli and Muiccia Prada. In 2013, watch out for “PUNK: Chaos to Couture” curated by Harold Koda and Andrew Bolton.
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York 10028-0198
(212) 535-7710

Fashion Institute of Technology (F.I.T.)
The Fashion Institute of Technology  has long been a forerunner in design, fashion, art, communications, and business. What began in 1944 with 100 students on the top two floors of the High School of Needle Trades, today serves more than 10,000 students and encompasses an entire city block. Located on W27th Street between 7th and 8th Avenues, it has been ranked among the top five fashion schools in the world. Francisco Costa, Nina Garcia, Carolina Herrera, Calvin Klein, Michael Kors, Nanette Lepore, Naomi Sims, and Joe Zee are all F.I.T. Alumni.
227 W 27th St
New York, NY 10001
(212) 217-7999

Parsons: The New School for Design
There are big shoes to fill in the halls and classrooms of Parsons, a design school founded by American impressionist William Merritt Chase in 1896. Former students include Alexander Wang, Narciso Rodriguez, Donna Karan and Isaac Mizrahi among others. Currently there are nearly 5,000 undergraduate and graduate students enrolled, studying everything from architectural design, to interior design to… of course… fashion design.
72 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10011
(212) 229-5150

Lord & Taylor
The oldest department store in the United States, Lord & Taylor opened its first doors in 1826 thanks to the innovative duo of Samuel Lord and George Washington Taylor. Initially selling women’s hosiery and cashmere shawls, Lord & Taylor has grown into an anchor of American fashion carrying designer names and exclusive lines for the whole family. Its flagship store and head office is located in the Garment District at 424 5th Avenue.
424 Fifth Avenue
New York NY 10018
(212) 391-3344

Mood Designer Fabrics
As seen on the hit series Project Runway, Mood Designer Fabrics is located in the heart of the Garment District. With three floors of fabrics, buttons, trim and other notions, you’ll be sure to find inspiration around every corner. The amount of materials Mood carries makes it one of the best spots in the city to find what you’re looking for.
225 West 37th Street, 3rd floor
New York, NY 10018
(212) 730-5003

Other Stories You Might Like

Leave a Reply